Buddhist catholic views on euthanasia

Keown, Damien Buddhism on Euthanasia In Buddhism, ethics are rooted in concerns related to virtue, karma, and liberation rather than the views of a divine being. This different perspective makes the issue no less complex and difficult, however.

Buddhist catholic views on euthanasia

Steve Hagen Buddhism on Euthanasia In Buddhism, ethics are rooted in concerns related to virtue, karma, and liberation rather than the views of a divine being.

This different perspective makes the issue no less complex and difficult, however. The following article explores the related issues of suicide and euthanasia in Buddhist scriptures, Buddhist history, and modern Buddhist Buddhist catholic views on euthanasia.

There are three instances of suicide in the Pali Canon: All three monks are seriously and painfully ill and appear to have ultimately taken their own lives. It seems that none of them were arhats before their death, although they my have attained enlightenment at the moment of their death.

Euthanasia - a Catholic View

In the case of Channa, the suffering monk describes his pain and deteriorating condition to Sairputta, a monk who has come to visit him. The following exchange then takes place: Let the venerable Channa live-- we want the venerable Channa to live!

If he lacks suitable food, I will go in search of suitable food for him. If he lacks suitable medicine, I will go in search of suitable medicine for him.

If he lacks a proper attendant, I will attend on him. Let the venerable Channa not use the knife! Without reproach was the knife used by the brother Channa. Some have interpreted this passage as showing that the Buddha condoned suicide, or perhaps condoned it only for arhats enlightened ones.

Others, however, argue that the Buddha merely exonerated Channa for his action due to his circumstances but did not condone Channa's action. Finding himself in this liberated state for the sixth time and not wanting to lose it before his death, he said, "What if I take the knife?

The Buddha's comment on Godhika's action is: Such indeed is how the steadfast act: They are not attached to life.

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Having drawn out craving at its root, Godhika has attained final Nirvana. The Buddha asks the monk if the body, the consciousness, feelings, etc.

Our assessment of the act of suicide in these cases is from a highly sophisticated religious angle. It applies only to the totally accomplished disciples, namely arahants. This would not be applicable even to the lower grades of monks. Much less in the case of ordinary laymen. It is also to be appreciated in this context that Buddhism accommodates a dimension of its own with regard to the concept of life and death.

Outside this frame, the Buddhist has to view terminating of life in suicide, no matter under what circumstances, as amounting to destruction of human life. Many mitigating factors could possibly be put forward and the offense could be sub-graded to man-slaughter, culpable homicide not amounting to murder etc.

BBC - Ethics - Euthanasia: Religion and euthanasia

In any case, destruction being by oneself, what is destroyed is believed to be one's own life. To the Buddhist, this position is untenable. What is destroyed is life, whether claimed as one's own or differentiated as that of another.

In Buddhism, the very first precept of admonition for good living [i. And the precept is equally binding on both monks and nuns, laymen and laywomen. I approached this subject expecting to find clear statements against suicide but, perhaps surprisingly, it is not possible, from a study of various instances in the Pali Canon, to come to any hard and fast conclusion regarding suicide.

There appear to be times when suicide in that context at least does no harm, though these must surely be very rare. Most samurais were Zen Buddhists, and their general philosophy was one in which length of life was regarded as far less important than honor.

Buddhist catholic views on euthanasia

Seppuku was practiced by samurai "to avoid the dishonour of capture, show loyalty to one's lord by following him into death, protest against some policy of a superior, or atone for failure. This violent method served to demonstrate the samurai's strength and courage, but would lead to a long, painful death.

Thus the ritual seppuku usually included a second samurai, an attendant, who would mercifully behead the one practicing seppuku shortly after he had slit open his own stomach or sometimes even as he reached for the knife. Not only the merciful actions of the second samurai, but the practice of seppuku itself has been compared to the modern-day practice of euthanasia:The petition brought tensions between the American Euthanasia Society and the Catholic Church to a head that contributed to a climate of anti-Catholic sentiment generally, regarding issues such as birth control, eugenics, and population control.

Euthanasia in The Pali Canon

The Ethical Approaches of Theravada Buddhism and Roman Catholicism Toward Euthanasia Death in its simplest definition is the absence of life. In its more scientific definition, it is the permanent cessation of all physical and biological functions that sustain a living organism.

Buddhist/Catholic Views on Euthanasia Essay The Ethical Approaches of Theravada Buddhism and Roman Catholicism Toward Euthanasia Death in its simplest definition is the absence of life. In its more scientific definition, it is the permanent cessation of all physical .

The Ethical Approaches of Theravada Buddhism and Roman Catholicism Toward Euthanasia Death in its simplest definition is the absence of life.

In its more scientific definition, it is the permanent cessation of all physical and biological functions that sustain a living organism. On September 12, , a statement was released by the Administrative Committee of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, and the statement centered on euthanasia.

Nov 23,  · Buddhism, euthanasia and suicide. Buddhists are not unanimous in their view of euthanasia, and the teachings of the Buddha don't explicitly deal with it.

Religious views on euthanasia - Wikipedia